Workforce Development News – Nov. 20, 2017

By on November 20, 2017
Digitalization and The American Workforce

A weekly collection of interesting, insightful, and innovative articles on workforce development, employment and training, business performance improvement, leadership, higher education, and the economy.

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The Workforce Solutions Group of St. Louis Community College leverages education for growth in the knowledge economy by offering programs and services designed to advance people, businesses and communities. We are located at the Corporate College, a state of the art facility solely dedicated to corporate education and professional development.
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Good Jobs That Pay without a BA: A State-by-State Analysis

“Education matters. More and more, good jobs are going to workers with bachelor’s degrees, who now hold 55 percent of all good jobs. For workers without BAs, associate’s degrees have become increasingly important for finding a good job. More associate’s degree holders are getting good jobs, while the number of these jobs held by workers with a high school diploma or less is in decline. This is especially true in Midwest states.”
Website: https://goodjobsdata.org/
Report: http://goodjobsdata.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/Good-Jobs-States.pdf

Digitalization and The American Workforce

“Digitalization is associated with increased pay and job resiliency in the face of automation but also vastly uneven trends for job growth and wages. Sharp gender- and race-based challenges also exist.”
https://www.brookings.edu/research/digitalization-and-the-american-workforce/

How Computer Science Skills Spread in the Job Market

“Even in jobs that aren’t traditional computing jobs, employers are seeking computer science skills from applicants. This report focuses on five job areas where computer science skills are in strong or growing demand: Data Analysis, Engineering and Manufacturing, Design, Marketing, and Programming and Information Technology.”
http://burning-glass.com/research/rebooting-jobs-computer-science-skills/

A Peek at Future Jobs Shows Growing Economic Divides

“In much of the South and Midwest, a large share of the population works in fields where employment is expected to decline by 2026.”
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/24/business/economy/future-jobs.html

What Americans Expect The Future of Automation to Look Like

Programs that diagnose and treat diseases, fully automated stores, deliveries by robots or drones, and 3-D printed products at home.
http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2017/11/16/what-americans-expect-the-future-of-automation-to-look-like/

Missouri DED Releases October 2017 Jobs Report

“Missouri’s unemployment rate fell to 3.5 percent in October, while total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 1,000 jobs, on a seasonally adjusted basis. This is the lowest seasonally adjusted unemployment rate since July 2000. In October 2016, the rate was 4.6 percent. For comparison, the national rate in October 2017 was 4.1 percent.”
https://ded.mo.gov/content/ded-releases-october-2017-jobs-report

Corporate Learning Programs Need to Consider Context, Not Just Skills

“Learning should be guided by a company’s strategy and execution.”
https://hbr.org/2017/11/corporate-learning-programs-need-to-consider-context-not-just-skills

Managers Aren’t Doing Enough to Train Employees for the Future

“Here are three ways to fix that.”
https://hbr.org/2017/11/managers-arent-doing-enough-to-train-employees-for-the-future

We build too many walls and not enough bridges.” – Isaac Newton

About Richard Schumacher

Richard Schumacher is the technology manager for the Workforce Solutions Group of St. Louis Community College. He connects, designs, and applies technology to meet business user needs with eLearning, training, web content, instructional design, IT system, and performance improvement solutions. Richard is a Microsoft Certified Trainer (MCT) and has held Microsoft Certifications since 1993. Learn more about Richard by following him: LinkedInTwitterGoogle+ArticlesEmail

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